Saturday, April 3, 2010

DECISION MAKING STYLES

Decision making style proposes people differ along two dimensions in the way they approach decision making. The first is an individuals way of thinking. Some people tend to be rational and logical and others tend to be creative and intuitive. The other dimension describes an individuals tolerance for ambiguity. Some people have a low tolerance for ambiguity and others have high level of ambiguity. Based on way of thinking and tolerance for ambiguity decision making styles can be of four types.

(1) Directive Style: Managers using directive style have low tolerance for ambiguity and are rational in their way of thinking. They are efficient and logical. They make fast decisions with minimal information and assessing few alternatives.

(2) Analytic Style: Managers with an analytic style have high tolerance for ambiguity than do directive type and are rational in their way of thinking. They need more information and consider more alternatives. They are characterized as careful decision makers with the ability to cope with unique situations.

(3) Conceptual Style: Managers with conceptual style have high tolerance for ambiguity and an intuitive way of thinking. They tend to be very broad to their outlook and consider many alternatives. They are at finding creative solutions to problems.

(4) Behavioral Style: Managers with behavioral style have low tolerance for ambiguity and an intuitive way of thinking. They work well with others. They are receptive to suggestions from others. They often use meetings to communicate although they try to avoid conflict. They want to be accepted by others.

Some managers will rely almost exclusively on their dominant style, while others are flexible and can shift their style depending on the situation. Some may take their time carefully weighing alternatives and considering riskier options whereas others may be more concerned about getting suggestions from others before making decisions. This doesn't make one approach better than the other. It is just their decision-making styles, which are different.

No comments:

Post a Comment